Nevada Caucus: Results Reactions and Responses

February 22nd was the second caucus for the Democratic Party, and the first state of significant minority numbers to have an effect on the delegation process for US Democrats in the upcoming election. The caucus was a critical step in discovering who minorities, such as Latinos and African Americans, would vote for, along with one of the most important votes for Union Workers of Nevada. The caucus was a complete success as opposed to the utter fiasco that took place only weeks ago in Iowa that delayed results for over a day due to technological issues. 

Breitbart

Nick Sanchez-Zarkos, Writer

Nevada Caucus: Results Reactions and Responses

-Nick Sanchez-Zarkos-

February 22nd was the second caucus for the Democratic Party, and the first state of significant minority numbers to have an effect on the delegation process for US Democrats in the upcoming election. The caucus was a critical step in discovering who minorities, such as Latinos and African Americans, would vote for, along with one of the most important votes for Union Workers of Nevada.

The caucus was a complete success as opposed to the utter fiasco that took place only weeks ago in Iowa that delayed results for over a day due to technological issues. 

The Nevada Caucus is significant in that it is the first Western state primary or caucus and reveals a more unique group of voters as opposed to the voter population in Iowa and New Hampshire. In its history, Nevada’s winners have often been the winners of the nomination, choosing Clinton in 2016 and  Obama in 2012. 

While Nevada has been considered a blue state for many of our past elections, Democrats saw Nevada as a very important step in gaining the nomination process, and many of the candidates spent weeks campaigning in the Silver State.

Results and Reactions

(note: votes are recorded at 88% reporting)

-Bernie Sanders- 6,120 votes-47.1% 12 delegates

Senator Sanders shows no signs of stopping. After winning both Iowa and New Hampshire (by vote count), Sanders appears to be the strongest and most popular Democratic candidate of the remaining eight. After fighting fiercely with fellow candidate Pete Buttigieg, Bernie looked to Nevada as a way to secure his number of delegates outpassed the former Mayor’s. Many Democrats fear that Sanders is too liberal and would lose against current sitting president Donald Trump. It continues to look likely that Sanders will win the Democratic nomination.

-Joe Biden- 2,723 votes-21% 2 delegates

Former Vice President Joe Biden received the push he needed in Nevada to put him back in a proper spot to win the nomination. With some of the fewest number of delegates, Joe Biden appeared to be losing the traction and supporter base that he needed if he hoped to win the nomination. However, following this recent caucus it seems likely that the minority vote was what Biden needed to climb back to the top and fight for the presidency.

-Pete Buttigieg- 1,722 votes-13.7% 1 delegate

The former mayor of South Bend Indiana is continuing to surprise voters and Democrats in his success in the first few primaries and caucuses. After claiming victory in Iowa and only losing to Sanders by a narrow percentage in New Hampshire, Buttigieg seems to be continuing to rise in support, appearing as a promising educated and young candidate that many are looking for. Despite his recent success, however, Pete’s third-place ranking in this more racially diverse state just seems to prove that the Mayor has a dearth of minority supporters, which could inevitably lead to his downfall.

-Elizabeth Warren- 1,243-9.6% 

After an insurmountable victory in last week’s debate stage, taking on fellow candidates and showing her unmatched debate strength, Warren took fourth place in the Nevada Caucus. With a large grassroots group of supporters, Warren likely got the slight nudge she needed here to continue, as her campaign’s future looked grim following losses in Iowa and New Hampshire. Warren has since the beginning been one of the strongest Democratic candidates, backed by many newspapers, actors, and groups of people. Though she lacks a large amount of racially diverse support, her supporters are strong and many. Despite this, it seems unlikely that she will win the nomination unless some miracle occurs or she pounds out other candidates on the debate stage and forces them to leave the campaign. 

-Tom Steyer- 604 votes-4.7% 

That’s right, reader, I put Tom Steyer before Amy Klobuchar. Why is that you ask? Because the billionaire philanthropist currently has received more votes than the Senator. Tom Steyer quite frankly has nothing keeping him afloat in the Democratic Race, but his significant number of minority supporters appeared to have come through for the caucus. Due to his significant wealth, Steyer appears to have no future plans of dropping the race and continues to fight for votes and delegates. While it is certainly a victory to beat Klobuchar, Tom will likely need to drop his campaign before the end of March.

 

-Amy Klobuchar- 506 votes- 3.9%

Tough break for the former Senator, after failing to show her usual debate charm last week, she has received fewer votes than Tom Steyer. The Senator had a surge in votes in New Hampshire, which did earn her some delegates, but it is likely that Klobuchar will not get this momentum back that she would need to beat out the candidates ahead of her. While she appears to be doing well financially, I see no point in Klobuchar continuing her campaign past Super Tuesday.

-Tulsi Gabbard-

You know it’s time to drop when Andrew Yang, a man who has already suspended his campaign, gets more votes than you do. Drop out Tulsi. Enough said.

-Michael Bloomberg-

Bloomberg was not able to make the list of candidates for Nevada’s caucus but his presence in the Democratic race is far from done.

 

-Predictions-

South Carolina is only a week away, and I have some bold predictions for that primary along with what comes next for the candidates. I personally believe that it seems likely there will be a narrow fight between Biden and Sanders in South Carolina, and one dependent on this week’s debate. If Biden does well in the debate it is very possible that he beats out the Vermont Senator and wins South Carolina. If not, it is likely Sanders will win. Third or fourth place will likely go to none other than Tom Steyer, who gained a surprising number of votes in Nevada. His minority supporters could very well put him in the top three positions, as he has also qualified for the debate this week and will likely have an impressive debate presence. The next candidates in order will likely be Warren, Buttigieg, and at last Klobuchar. 

 

Bernie- Likely the winner of South Carolina, the senator is looking like possibly being the frontrunner and possible nominee

 

Joe Biden- Biden’s success is dependent on South Carolina. Enough said.

 

Buttigieg- Losing momentum in the Silver State only means that Pete has to have an impressive showing in the next debate to hope to earn fourth place in South Carolina and beat Warren.

 

Warren- She appears to be gaining the momentum needed to boost her campaign. If she does as well as she did in the Nevada debate this week it is possible she will earn herself 3rd or 4th place in South Carolina

 

Tom Steyer- While his chances of being the nominee are close to none, the billionaire philanthropist appears to have high numbers in South Carolina and could possibly earn himself his first delegates. Despite this, I do not see his campaign making it too far past Super Tuesday.

 

Klobuchar- The Senator is not going to make it far past Super Tuesday, after a measly voting number in Nevada. Nothing short of a miracle will bring her success in South Carolina.

 

Gabbard- Please drop out Tulsi Gabbard. Stop wasting our time.