The Expectations Freshmen Have for High School

A+group+of+freshman+boys+pose+for+a+picture+in+the+high+school+cafeteria

A group of freshman boys pose for a picture in the high school cafeteria

Bennett Abeson

Becoming a freshman is a major milestone for any adolescent, and with this, brings about a usually negative stigma about freshman year. High school comes across as more serious and busy than what the incoming freshmen are used to.

“I was really expecting a harsh environment and lots of negativity throughout the building,” says John Crough, a new freshman at Liberty.

Movies and other media add to the stigma by commonly depicting high school as an environment chalk full of bullying and stress. Many incoming freshmen had similar worries and expected high school to be like the media portrays it.

“I was expecting it to be extremely cliche, and I was expecting the common things you see in movies,” says Seth Liyanapathirana ’22.

Many of these things he was expecting such as bullying and strictness are virtually, and thankfully, nonexistent in the hallways of Olentangy Liberty High School.

Another common worry freshmen may have is the idea of getting lost in the size and scope of the school.

“I was really worried about not being able to find my classes,” says Christopher Patterson ’22.

Olentangy Liberty High School is infamous for having way too many kids, and with a student body of around 2,150 students, Liberty accurately fits that description. Freshmen are often worried that with this many students, classes will be difficult to find and they will often be late.

Despite all these worries, after their own personal experiences, freshmen realize high school isn’t so awful.

“I thought that the hallways would be really busy,” says Crough. “It’s so much more relaxed than I thought it would be and not nearly as busy,” says Crough.  

Wyatt Fratianne, another freshman, described it as “pretty good,” and “not as stressful or intimidating as I thought.”

High school is a huge change for students, but it is usually quite positive in terms of the new freedoms and rules of a bigger school.

As Patterson perfectly explains his thoughts, “High school has been a good change so far and I’m glad to see it’s not as bad as I thought.”